Category Archives: Art

Lichtenbrg Figures

Lichtenberg Figures:  A. R. von Hippel, 1951 by Gyorgy Kepes (U.S.A., b. Hungary 1906-2001) Photographic enlargement on particleboard Lent by Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries Click image for larger view.

Lichtenberg Figures: A. R. von Hippel, 1951 by Gyorgy Kepes (U.S.A., b. Hungary 1906-2001)
Photographic enlargement on particleboard
Lent by Department of Special Collections, Stanford University Libraries
Click image for larger view.

More at NYRB Classics

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg 1742-1799

“(Lion) fell in love in his tenth year with a boy named Schmidt (best pupil in the school), the son of a tailor, liked to hear him talked about and got all the boys to converse with him, never spoke to him himself but it gave him great pleasure to hear that the boy had spoken of him. Climbed up on a wall after school to see him go out of school. Now he still remembers his physiognomy very clearly, and he was far from handsome, a turned-up nose and red cheeks. But he was first in school. I should be sorry if by this free confession I should increase the world’s mistrust, but I was a human being and if happiness is ever to be attained in this world it must not be sought through concealment, not at all, nothing firm can come about in that way. Lasting happiness is to be found only in uprightness and sincerity…” From The Waste Books, translated by R. J. Hollingdale

“Lion” is one of the names Lichtenberg adopted when he wrote about himself in the third person, i.e. objectively.

Graphing The History of Ideas

Some people do really nice work sometime. Got these graphs from here and here. Visit the aforementioned pages for details and closeups, and click the following images to download larger views.

Influential Thinkers

Influential Thinkers

A History of Philosophy

A History of Philosophy

Also take a look at The History of Western Philosophy.

Portrait of Shāh Ṭahmasp, Walters Manuscript W.668, fol.4b | Click image for larger view.

Portrait of Shāh Ṭahmasp, Walters Manuscript W.668, fol.4b | Click image for larger view.

Album of Persian and Indian calligraphy and paintings
This is an album (muraqqaʿ) of Persian and Indian calligraphy and paintings, most probably compiled in the thirteenth century AH / nineteenth CE. The album contains thirty-four illustrations, three of which are attributed to the Mughal painter Abū al-Ḥasan (Nādir al-al-Zamān), two to Manūhar, and one each to Dawlat and Ṣādiqī. There are several portraits of rulers and courtiers, as well as scenes from historical manuscripts, such as Bāburnāmah and Gulistān by Saʿdī. This album is also significant for the number of works by the artist Shayk Abbāsī, who worked in the eleventh century AH / seventeenth CE. The signed calligraphic pieces bear the names of ʿImād al-Ḥasanī (d. 1024 AH / 1615 CE), ʿAlī Riz̤ā-ʾi ʿAbbāsī, Mīr ʿAlī, and ʿAbd al-Rashīd al-Daylamī (d. 1081 AH / 1670-1 CE). The album was initially in an accordion format and was later made into a codex. The lacquer binding with central ovals and pendants decorated with flowers dates to the thirteenth century AH / nineteenth CE. — Walters Art Museum Illuminated Manuscripts

Night of the Moon

Click the thumbnails above for details of the paintings.
Source: Freer and Sackler Galleries.

The Mid Autumn Festival, also known as the Moon or Mooncake Festival is intricately lined to the legends of Chang E, the mythical Moon Goddess of Immortality. According to “Li-Ji”, an ancient Chinese book recording customs and ceremonies, the Chinese Emperor should offer sacrifices to the sun in spring and the moon in autumn. The 15th day of the 8th lunar month is the day called “Mid-Autumn”. The night on the 15th of the 8th lunar month is also called “Night of the Moon”. Under the Song Dynasty (420), the day was officially declared the Mid-Autumn Festival.

Gibbon reaching for reflection of the moon

Gibbon reaching for reflection of the moon

Three hares looking at the moon

Three hares looking at the moon

Liu Hai Fishing for his Toad by Moonlight

Liu Hai Fishing for his Toad by Moonlight

The Seventh Spring

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn :: Four Orientals seated under a tree; bearded old men wearing turbans, seated in a half-circle on a terrace, one holding a cup, the other a book, a steep rocky outcrop behind. c.1656-1661 | Click image for larger view. | source: britishmuseum.org

Aftab Datta had promptly uploaded the following gems from his collection for the seventh anniversary of sarangi.info, and I am responsible for the tardiness of this post. Emerson says in Spiritual Laws, “If you visit your friend, why need you apologize for not having visited him, and waste his time and deface your own act? Visit him now.”

Happy Equinox!

{233,1}*
muddat hu’ii hai yaar ko mihmaaN kiye hu’e
josh-e qadah se bazm chiraaghaaN kiye hu’e

it’s been some time since the beloved/friend was made a guest
[and] the mehfil illuminated with the fervor of the [wine] cup

Ahmad Ali and Rahmat Ali Khan – Shuddh Sarang
Amanat Ali and Fateh Ali Khan – Miyan Malhar
Moinuddin and Aminuddin Dagar – Durga (Khamaj Thaat)
Amir Khan – Megh (unpublished)
Anant Manohar Joshi – Mawra
Anoklal Misra – Teentaal (tabla solo)
Arnab Chakrabarty – Des (sarod)
Ashraf Sharif Khan – Chhayanat (sitar)
Azmat Hussain Khan – Shuddh Nat
Badal Khan – Bhairav Bahar (sarangi)
Bashir Hussain – Asavari (sarangi)
Begum Akhtar – morii ho tuut gayii
Bade Ghulam Ali Khan – Sohni (1954)
Bhimsen Joshi – Lalit
Bundu Khan – Tilak Kamod (sarangi)
Chand Khan – Marubehag
Fateh Ali Khan – Hamsadhwani
Fayyaz Khan – Bageshree (Tarana)
Gajananrao Joshi – Puriya
Govind Prasad Jaipurwale – Rageshree
Hamid Hussain – Madhkauns (sarangi)
Hiradai Barodekar – Todi
Ijaz Hussain Hazravi – albaila yaar russi russi janda
Ilyas Hussain Khan – Chandni Kedar
Inderlal Dhandra – Gaud Sarang (sarangi)
Ismail Azad – na hum daulat ke bhooke haiN
Jagdish Prasad – Abhogi
Kabir – Aimen (sitar)
Kalyan Mukherjea – Hansakinkini
Khadim Hussain Khan – Adana (Tarana)
Latafat Hussain Khan – Lalit (Drut)
Latafat Hussain Khan – Miyan ka Sarang
Mehdi Hassan – Desi (Ghazal)
Moinuddin Khan – Nand (sarangi)
Mujahid Hussain Khan – Puriya Kalyan
Nabi Bakhsh – Shahana (sarangi)
Nathu Khan – Lalit (sarangi)
Nazakat Ali and Zakir Ali Khan – Bilaskhani Todi
Nissar Hussain Khan – Todi
Swami Parvatikar – Todi (dattatreya veena)
Sharif Khan Poonchwale – Behag (sitar)
Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar – Lalit
Ramzan Khan – Nat Bhairav (sarangi)
Rashid Khan – Jog
Rasiklal Andharia – Shuddh Sarang
Naseeruddin Saami – Darbari, Drut in Adana (Lahore Music Forum)
Naseeruddin Saami – Mand
Sadiq Ali Khan – Shankara (been)
Nazakat Ali and Salamat Ali Khan – Alhaiya Bilawal (Radio Pakistan)
Salamat Ali and Sharafat Salamat – Kamod
Shahid Parvez – Shyam Kalyan (sitar)
Shakoor Khan – Kedar (sarangi)
Sharafat Hussain Khan – Raisa Kanada
Sultan Khan – Patdeep (sarangi)
Surendranath – Darbari (been)
Swami Vallabhdas – Jog
Tarapada Chakraborty – Marwa
Vasantrao Deshpande – Chhayanat
Vijay Raghav Rao – Abhogi (bansuri)
Zia Moinuddin Dagar – Bhairavi (been)